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Weekly Reading 21st to 28th January

Another reading for the third week in January. How did last week’s reading affect you? did you read it before the week began? Or did you read it during the week? Did it work for you, or not? Comment below to tell us how your week went.Or come and join us at our Facebook Group and share your experiences with us all. This one shows a mixture of cards, minor and major arcana alike. All we can do is live day by day and then see how the week pans out.

  1. VI SWORDS-Sunday 21st January. Well, I don’t know about you, but I do not someone has thrown a spanner in my works for this day. The card itself looks ominous, doesn’t it? Yes, this card tells it all. Off to a start with a difference. Not necessarily bad, but knowing there is something going on for today that is not quite right.
  2. ACE WANDS-Monday 22nd January. As it stands, the ace alone is a good sign for stability. Standing fast and standing on principle. Standing for belief and not allowing yourself to falter. It will be one of those days when what you believe in will be challenged. Can you get over it? Monday being a traditional work day will through open its challenges enough without adding this leading card. Be warned.
  3. VIII WANDS-Tuesday 23rd January. Well, don’t say you you haven’t been warned. Another busy day at the office. Where ever your work is, there will be hard labour. That being said, one man’s had labour (or woman’s for that matter) can be another’s love. So don’t knock it until it is done.
  4. IX SWORDS-Wednesday 24th January. The hurt and anxious emotion only digs in a deeper halfway through the week. There seems little relief in sight but wait for the weekend when the emotions will improve. In the meantime, they are growing. As the saying says, it has to get worse before it gets better. Good luck and try to find a quiet place to meditate and breathe.
  5. V SWORDS-Thursday 25th January. This card brings some relief as you find yourself standing, looking, ever watchful of your enemy (your angst of course) returning to make you feel worse. Know that the worse is over and you are surmounting difficulties along the way.
  6. KING WANDS-Friday 26th January. (For Australians, this is Australia Day). While the suite wands is traditional for work, it also stands for stability. The King sits on his throne ever watchful for trouble looming. It looks as though it has been diverted though, so we are in for an easier end of the week. (did I mention it is Australia Day today? That means a Holiday for us Down Under)
  7. II WANDS-Saturday 27th January. Finally, we see balance being restored to our daily lives. What a blessing this is for the last day of the week, otherwise known as The Sabbath. Enjoy the day for what it is and take each day as it comes.
  8. THE CHARIOT- Month of January. The connection of this card to the rest of the reading is driving us in our mode of transport. What is it that is taking us on our journey this week? It is The Chariot. It begins by delivering the suite of Swords to us, showing the two edge of all of them, therefore showing us what we are made of. How did you make it through the month thus far? How about the week? Comment on what happened during this week – good and bad.
  9. ACE SWORDS-Year of 2018. I made up my mind that this is going to be the year I complete my tasks, my WIP. I have made a start, though am uncertain of completion. Still, the month is not over yet, nor is the year. I wonder, perhaps like you, if it will be full of the interruptions I have experienced thus far.
    We will be in need of slow methodical ways (or transport as in the preceding card). Instead of going like a Bull in a China Shop, we need to slow down and take each day as it comes. Slow and steady wins the race after all. Perhaps it is time to become the tortoise, not the hare.

I hope you are enjoying my weekly readings. Please let me know what you think by commenting on these posts week by week – either at the beginning or end. You can also see them in our Facebook Group

If you would like a reading from Sandy cee, please contact us today.

Bright Blessings
Sandy Cee

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Tibetan Singing Bowls Article

According to Tibetan oral tradition, existence of singing bowls dates back to the time of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni (560 – 480 B.C.). The tradition came from India to Tibet, along with the teachings of the Buddha, by the great tantric master Padmasambhava in the 8th century A.D.

Singing bowls produce sounds, which invoke a deep state of relaxation which naturally assists one in entering into meditation, the goal being enlightenment. They are a quintessential aid to meditation, and are found on private Buddhist altars, and in temples, monasteries and meditation halls throughout the world.

A metallurgical analysis, done by the British Museum in London, reveals that the instruments are made of a 12-metal alloy consisting of silver, nickel, copper, zinc, antimony, tin, lead, cobalt, bismuth, arsenic, cadmium and iron. Now a lost art, it seems that this quality of bowl cannot be reproduced today.

In addition to their traditional usage for meditation, Tibetan singing bowls are used for deep relaxation, stress reduction, holistic healing, Reiki, Chakra Balancing, and World music. Many people find that the rich blend of harmonic overtones which the bells produce have a direct effect upon their chakras.

Playing the bowls usually causes an immediate centring effect. The tones set up a “frequency following response” that creates balancing left/right brain synchronization. Meditating on the subtle sounds of the Tibetan singing bowl tunes one in to the universal sound within and without.

Previously used in Tibet for meditation and ceremonial purposes, Tibetan Singing Bowls are struck with a padded mallet or rubbed around the rim with a playing mallet to produce a fascinating blend of harmonic resonance’s and rich overtones.

Tibetan singing bowls or Himalayan “singing bowls” are dynamically resonant producing soothing overtones…called singing bowls because when rubbed in a circular movement along the outside lip with a striker, a clear and beautiful sound is released. The sound is definitely soothing. The sound frequency is definitely richer when the cushion is used with the bowls

Imagine using the singing bowl to free up the tensions of stressed children or for us busy adults. Each bowl is cast from a secret formula of metal alloys, and then hammered into shape. Exact dimensions and shape vary somewhat from bowl to bowl.

Playing Instructions and Tips:-

  • Technique 1.
      • Hold the singing bowl on the palm of one hand. For smaller bowls, seven inches and under, hold on your fingertips.
      • Grasp the rubbing stick about mid-length, with all the fingertips pointing downwards and touching the wood. Palm down.
      • Gently tap the rubbing stick against the side of the bowl to “warm-up” the bell.
      • Now gently tap the bowl once in a clock-wise direction from the further point from you. Then at the right side once, again at the closest point to you, then finally at the most left point of the bowl. You will make four taps.
    • Technique 2.
      • Following on from the first three points above…
      • Now, with an even pressure, rub the rubbing stick clockwise around the outside edge of the rim of the bowl. Use a full arm movement, just like stirring a big kettle of soup, and keep the mallet straight up and down! Again, it’s not a wrist movement, but a full-arm movement.
      • Remember to apply pressure– the mallet friction against the
        outer rim produces vibrations which result in sound.

Experiment with your speed. Usually people go too fast! Let the sound build up slowly as the singing bowl picks up the vibration.

Breaking in Your Rubbing Stick

The rubbing stick that comes with your Tibetan singing bowl is handmade of Himalayan hardwood. When you play the bowl, using the stick-around-the-rim technique, the friction of the stick produces vibrations which result in the sound. In the beginning the stick is relatively smooth, but as you continue to use it, it will develop “micro-grooves”, shallow grooves which help to grab more of the playing edge of the bowl. Allow about five minutes for initial break-in of a new rubbing stick. As you use it more the micro-grooves become impressed in your rubbing stick and you will get better sound and easier playing from your bowl.

The Wah-Wah

Most all Tibetan singing bowls have natural wah-wahs which you can amplify and bend by using the wah-wah technique.

  • Get the bowl singing by using the mallet-around-the-rim technique described above. Pull the mallet away from the bowl and let the bowl continue to sing.
  • While still holding the bowl in your hand, raise the bowl up to your mouth so that the outside rim is just above the opening of your mouth and about an inch away.
  • Open and close your mouth while thinking of the sound wah-wah. You are not actually making any sound with your mouth, but simply changing the shape of the oral cavity so as to allow the sound of the singing bowl to bounce around inside of your mouth and then be reflected back. By changing the size of the oral cavity you are modulating the sound!

Experiment with the relative position of your mouth to the outside bowl rim. Also, if you turn the bowl, while experimenting with the wah-wah effect, you will find “hot spots” where the bowl is naturally louder.

Water Bowl Sounds

A special sound effect can be produced by adding a small amount of water to the bottom of the singing bowl. The sounds produced using this technique sound like dolphins singing!

  • The amount of water to use varies with the individual bowl. Start by pouring about 3/4″ of water into the bowl. Be careful NOT to get the outside rim of the bowl wet.
  • Now, play the bowl using the stick-around- the-rim technique. Bring up the sound by using a steady even pressure. Pull the rubbing stick away from the bowl rim and let the bowl continue to sing.
  • Still holding the bowl in your hand, tilt the bowl so that the water inside gently laps up toward the inside rim. Continue to gently swirl and tilt the bowl and the water.

Experiment with the amount of water used. Usually the best effect is produced with a minimum amount of water. Keep a towel handy for when spills may happen. This can be especially interesting if you add some fragrant flowers such as Gardenia, or frangipani to the water and allow the fragrance to “float” through the air. Remember not to keep the water in the bowls whilst not attending to it as it can become corrosive to the bowl.

However and above all, enjoy, respect and play your singing bowl with the love that you have from The Universe and it will reward you richly.

To View and download this article click this link.

To buy a Tibetan Singing Bowl

Bright Blessings